Latest Tweets:

portraitsofboston:

“Hey man, take my picture!”
“I can’t do it. It’s too dark.”
“Yeah, we need some light. Let’s go over there.”
“Are you homeless?”
“Yes, I am.”
“How long have you been homeless?”
“15 years. I’ve been in Boston 8 months. Before that I was in Washington, Virginia, New York, Philadelphia, Louisiana, Florida…”
“Why didn’t you stay in Florida? It’s so much warmer.”
“I wanted to see my family. But they don’t want to see me. They don’t understand depression. They treat me like dirt. Homeless people treat me better than my family.”
“And what happened 15 years ago? How did you end up on the streets?”
“I tried to burn myself twice. I had 30 surgeries. I was dead two times, but God brought me back. I don’t know why.”
“And why did you do it?”
“I was depressed. Why you crying?”
“Because you are a beautiful person, and my family is really messed up, and I’ve been very depressed. I think I can understand you.”
“Yes, I am a good person. And when you take people’s pictures, don’t disrespect them.”
“No, man, I won’t. I like people. That’s why I take their pictures.”
“And when you make your portfolio, don’t denigrate people. Let the pictures speak for themselves.”
“I will. Are you safe on the streets?”
“Yes, I am…And now I have $8 to buy me some food.”
“That’s all I have. Next time I see you, I will give you more.”
“No, man. It ain’t all about money. Give me a hug. And next time you see me, give me a hug again. And thanks for taking my picture.”

portraitsofboston:

“Hey man, take my picture!”

“I can’t do it. It’s too dark.”

“Yeah, we need some light. Let’s go over there.”

“Are you homeless?”

“Yes, I am.”

“How long have you been homeless?”

“15 years. I’ve been in Boston 8 months. Before that I was in Washington, Virginia, New York, Philadelphia, Louisiana, Florida…”

“Why didn’t you stay in Florida? It’s so much warmer.”

“I wanted to see my family. But they don’t want to see me. They don’t understand depression. They treat me like dirt. Homeless people treat me better than my family.”

“And what happened 15 years ago? How did you end up on the streets?”

“I tried to burn myself twice. I had 30 surgeries. I was dead two times, but God brought me back. I don’t know why.”

“And why did you do it?”

“I was depressed. Why you crying?”

“Because you are a beautiful person, and my family is really messed up, and I’ve been very depressed. I think I can understand you.”

“Yes, I am a good person. And when you take people’s pictures, don’t disrespect them.”

“No, man, I won’t. I like people. That’s why I take their pictures.”

“And when you make your portfolio, don’t denigrate people. Let the pictures speak for themselves.”

“I will. Are you safe on the streets?”

“Yes, I am…And now I have $8 to buy me some food.”

“That’s all I have. Next time I see you, I will give you more.”

“No, man. It ain’t all about money. Give me a hug. And next time you see me, give me a hug again. And thanks for taking my picture.”

(Source: portraits-of-america, via eloquentsincerity)

lips-richmond:

tranqualizer:

[photo: image of a Black homeless man wearing a white t shirt and holding a white Abercrombie and fitch branded t shirt in front of him.]
Why Fitch the Homeless is a Really Bad Idea
In response to some comments made by Abercrombie & Fitch CEO Michael Jeffries about not wanting large people in A&F clothes because he prefers “attractive…cool kids” in A&F clothes, there’s been a pretty big backlash, which is understandable. Most recently, I’ve learned about some “activism” aimed at giving Abercrombie and Fitch a “brand readjustment’” by giving Abercrombie and Fitch clothing to the homeless.
Because wouldn’t it be so awful for Abercrombie and Fitch clothing to be associated with homelessness and homeless people, because homeless people are so gross and disgusting, amirite? The video above says that it is striving to make Abercrombie and Fitch “the #1 brand of homeless apparel”. Maybe you’re thinking there’s no issue here because at least homeless people are getting some new duds and they were purchased from Goodwill, so what’s the big deal?
The big deal comes in when homeless people are being exploited to prove a point. Many homeless people are already widely disenfranchised and lacking a platform to be heard or to get access to the resources they need. By attempting to make a brand look bad by associating it with homelessness, the message is that homeless people are so gross, dirty, shameful (insert negative attribute here) that by associating the brand with these types of people, we are really making the brand look shitty, because these people are so shitty! get it? It’s all such a laugh! This type of “activism” is a farce. It contributes to and propagates a culture wherein homeless people can be used as props to further an agenda. This isn’t how you treat people. This is how you treat disposable objects. It isn’t funny, noble, or helpful to try and stick it to Abercrombie and Fitch by using homeless people as the medium for your message. Would the American population at large be comfortable with any other minority group being used to make a brand look “bad” by associating their clothing with that group? Sub out “homeless” for any other minority group and see how that sounds and feels. Pretty shitty, right?
Giving clothing, food, needed sundries, time, and other resources to the homeless or people who are in need is an awesome thing. But this isn’t about giving to the homeless. I don’t see any real or actual concern for homeless people in this “movement”. I see homeless people being used as the butt of a joke. The punchline? “Hahaha Abercrombie! You want cool and attractive people in your clothes and you claim to be exclusionary, so we’re going to give your clothes to homeless people because you would hate that!” The implication here is that homeless people are not cool or attractive and the brand can’t be exclusionary when worn by an already excluded group. This only “works” because homeless people are already part of an othered and excluded group, often left out of mainstream society, denied access to basic resources and the ability to have their needs met. Can’t.Stop.Laughing.
People who want to give to the homeless can do so at any time. Do it today! But giving a certain brand of clothing to the homeless in an attempt to make that brand of clothing look bad or unsavory or less-than-desirable is only possible when the population or group receiving the clothing carries the stigma you are trying to attach to that label. This doesn’t make Abercrombie and Fitch look bad. This makes Greg Karber and everybody supporting this “activism” look like an insensitive douche canoe who thinks homeless people are disposable props to be used to further an agenda, and that’s pretty sad and disappointing. Wanna help the homeless? Try not furthering the stigma surrounding homelessness by insisting that a brand being associated with homelessness would surely be less desirable or wanted. Wanna stick it to Abercrombie and Fitch? Easy Peasy! Don’t give them your money! It’s a simple solution that doesn’t involve stepping on the backs of the homeless in place of a soapbox.
(click through the link to watch the youtube video)

YUUUUPP

I was really trying to find the words to why I disliked this movement. These are those words.

lips-richmond:

tranqualizer:

[photo: image of a Black homeless man wearing a white t shirt and holding a white Abercrombie and fitch branded t shirt in front of him.]

Why Fitch the Homeless is a Really Bad Idea

In response to some comments made by Abercrombie & Fitch CEO Michael Jeffries about not wanting large people in A&F clothes because he prefers “attractive…cool kids” in A&F clothes, there’s been a pretty big backlash, which is understandable. Most recently, I’ve learned about some “activism” aimed at giving Abercrombie and Fitch a “brand readjustment’” by giving Abercrombie and Fitch clothing to the homeless.

Because wouldn’t it be so awful for Abercrombie and Fitch clothing to be associated with homelessness and homeless people, because homeless people are so gross and disgusting, amirite? The video above says that it is striving to make Abercrombie and Fitch “the #1 brand of homeless apparel”. Maybe you’re thinking there’s no issue here because at least homeless people are getting some new duds and they were purchased from Goodwill, so what’s the big deal?

The big deal comes in when homeless people are being exploited to prove a point. Many homeless people are already widely disenfranchised and lacking a platform to be heard or to get access to the resources they need. By attempting to make a brand look bad by associating it with homelessness, the message is that homeless people are so gross, dirty, shameful (insert negative attribute here) that by associating the brand with these types of people, we are really making the brand look shitty, because these people are so shitty! get it? It’s all such a laugh! This type of “activism” is a farce. It contributes to and propagates a culture wherein homeless people can be used as props to further an agenda. This isn’t how you treat people. This is how you treat disposable objects. It isn’t funny, noble, or helpful to try and stick it to Abercrombie and Fitch by using homeless people as the medium for your message. Would the American population at large be comfortable with any other minority group being used to make a brand look “bad” by associating their clothing with that group? Sub out “homeless” for any other minority group and see how that sounds and feels. Pretty shitty, right?

Giving clothing, food, needed sundries, time, and other resources to the homeless or people who are in need is an awesome thing. But this isn’t about giving to the homeless. I don’t see any real or actual concern for homeless people in this “movement”. I see homeless people being used as the butt of a joke. The punchline? “Hahaha Abercrombie! You want cool and attractive people in your clothes and you claim to be exclusionary, so we’re going to give your clothes to homeless people because you would hate that!” The implication here is that homeless people are not cool or attractive and the brand can’t be exclusionary when worn by an already excluded group. This only “works” because homeless people are already part of an othered and excluded group, often left out of mainstream society, denied access to basic resources and the ability to have their needs met. Can’t.Stop.Laughing.

People who want to give to the homeless can do so at any time. Do it today! But giving a certain brand of clothing to the homeless in an attempt to make that brand of clothing look bad or unsavory or less-than-desirable is only possible when the population or group receiving the clothing carries the stigma you are trying to attach to that label. This doesn’t make Abercrombie and Fitch look bad. This makes Greg Karber and everybody supporting this “activism” look like an insensitive douche canoe who thinks homeless people are disposable props to be used to further an agenda, and that’s pretty sad and disappointing. Wanna help the homeless? Try not furthering the stigma surrounding homelessness by insisting that a brand being associated with homelessness would surely be less desirable or wanted. Wanna stick it to Abercrombie and Fitch? Easy Peasy! Don’t give them your money! It’s a simple solution that doesn’t involve stepping on the backs of the homeless in place of a soapbox.

(click through the link to watch the youtube video)

YUUUUPP

I was really trying to find the words to why I disliked this movement. These are those words.

youknowyourebritishwhen:

punk-in-park-zoos:

norma-bara:

pinkpressthreat:

Grief-stricken homeless man seeks public’s help after his dog stolenCarl McDonald may be homeless, but his dog Scooby is his family and his life-saver in more ways than one. But now someone has stolen his 4-year-old Australian Kelpie away from him. Just before Christmas, the dog he calls “his daughter” was stolen while he slept.Carl was sleeping on the streets of Oxford, England, on the porch of St. Gile’s Church in the city centre and when he woke to find her gone. The Australian Kelpie was last seen lying next to him. Carl said he was sure Scooby was stolen because the lead which hadn’t been attached to her collar was also gone, as well as some dog treats and £38 which had been in his hat. Now that she’s gone he said he doesn’t know what to do. He told the Oxford Mail, “Dogs are everything when you are homeless. They keep you going and listen to you when you have no one to talk to.” He added, “I can’t sleep without her, it’s messing me up to be honest. It feels like someone has stolen my kid. I don’t know what I might do to myself really, I can’t live without her. She was like my daughter.”A homeless man’s beloved dog was stolenCarl has had Scooby since she was just 4-weeks-old when a friend gave her to him. He bottle-fed her as a puppy. Carl, 43 said he owes his life to Scooby after she saved him from a fire in an apartment last year. He recounts how last year she saved his life when an apartment he was staying at caught on fire. “Someone had left a candle on and the flat caught fire. She woke me up and dragged me to the door. I didn’t know where it was because of all the smoke.”He has a friend, Mandy Aitbaha, who is helping him search for Scooby by putting up posters.Mandy always stops to chat to Carl and say hello to Scooby while she shops. She’s noticed the effect Scooby’s theft has had on Carl. “I’m really worried about him, he’s depressed and without that dog he is suicidal. I always see them together, he loves that dog.”She said, “When I saw him a few days ago after Scooby went missing his head was down and he was crying. I couldn’t see Scooby so I knew something was wrong. He has been dealt a rough hand of cards as it is. His words to me were that he is staring death in the face so we really have to find her.”Volunteers for Dog Lost, a national website which tries to track down missing dogs, has been helping with the search for Scooby.Thames Valley Police spokesman Rhianne Pope confirmed Scooby was reported missing on December 19 and had not yet been found. She said Scooby’s disappearance was being treated as a theft. The Australian Kelpie which is primarily brown with a white blaze across her chest and was taken from Carl on December 19, 2012 from the St. Gile’s Church at 10 Woodstock Rd. If you have any information on Scooby’s disappearance contact Dog Lost or Thames Valley Police.Please reblog here, post to facebook (by clicking on photo) and anywhere else you think can make a difference ;) 


another photo of scooby



If any of our followers from around that area know anything or have their suspicions, please give your local police a call. Even if you’re not 100% sure, I’d bet Carl would be grateful you tried

When working with the homeless, I can vouch that the homeless population tends to take just as good, or even better care of dogs than a lot of the more well-to-do individuals. I’m a few countries away from England, but I’ll signal boost.

youknowyourebritishwhen:

punk-in-park-zoos:

norma-bara:

pinkpressthreat:

Grief-stricken homeless man seeks public’s help after his dog stolen

Carl McDonald may be homeless, but his dog Scooby is his family and his life-saver in more ways than one. But now someone has stolen his 4-year-old Australian Kelpie away from him. Just before Christmas, the dog he calls “his daughter” was stolen while he slept.

Carl was sleeping on the streets of Oxford, England, on the porch of St. Gile’s Church in the city centre and when he woke to find her gone. The Australian Kelpie was last seen lying next to him. Carl said he was sure Scooby was stolen because the lead which hadn’t been attached to her collar was also gone, as well as some dog treats and £38 which had been in his hat. Now that she’s gone he said he doesn’t know what to do. 

He told the Oxford Mail, “Dogs are everything when you are homeless. They keep you going and listen to you when you have no one to talk to.” He added, “I can’t sleep without her, it’s messing me up to be honest. It feels like someone has stolen my kid. I don’t know what I might do to myself really, I can’t live without her. She was like my daughter.”

A homeless man’s beloved dog was stolenCarl has had Scooby since she was just 4-weeks-old when a friend gave her to him. He bottle-fed her as a puppy. Carl, 43 said he owes his life to Scooby after she saved him from a fire in an apartment last year. He recounts how last year she saved his life when an apartment he was staying at caught on fire. “Someone had left a candle on and the flat caught fire. She woke me up and dragged me to the door. I didn’t know where it was because of all the smoke.”

He has a friend, Mandy Aitbaha, who is helping him search for Scooby by putting up posters.

Mandy always stops to chat to Carl and say hello to Scooby while she shops. She’s noticed the effect Scooby’s theft has had on Carl. “I’m really worried about him, he’s depressed and without that dog he is suicidal. I always see them together, he loves that dog.”

She said, “When I saw him a few days ago after Scooby went missing his head was down and he was crying. I couldn’t see Scooby so I knew something was wrong. He has been dealt a rough hand of cards as it is. His words to me were that he is staring death in the face so we really have to find her.”

Volunteers for Dog Lost, a national website which tries to track down missing dogs, has been helping with the search for Scooby.

Thames Valley Police spokesman Rhianne Pope confirmed Scooby was reported missing on December 19 and had not yet been found. She said Scooby’s disappearance was being treated as a theft. 

The Australian Kelpie which is primarily brown with a white blaze across her chest and was taken from Carl on December 19, 2012 from the St. Gile’s Church at 10 Woodstock Rd. If you have any information on Scooby’s disappearance contact Dog Lost or Thames Valley Police.

Please reblog here, post to facebook (by clicking on photo) and anywhere else you think can make a difference ;) 

image

another photo of scooby

If any of our followers from around that area know anything or have their suspicions, please give your local police a call. Even if you’re not 100% sure, I’d bet Carl would be grateful you tried

When working with the homeless, I can vouch that the homeless population tends to take just as good, or even better care of dogs than a lot of the more well-to-do individuals. I’m a few countries away from England, but I’ll signal boost.

(via lavellantempest)

*25
partyprofessor:

Hmm (story link)

Fail America.

partyprofessor:

Hmm (story link)

Fail America.

(Source: lunagemme, via hardcorecaringaboutstuff)